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The International Energy Agency's new report on CO2 Emissions



The International Energy Agency (IEA) has published a new report and a corresponding interactive #article on “CO2 Emissions” this week. The global #CO2#emissions and #energy demand numbers are based on the IEA’s detailed region-by-region and fuel-by-fuel #analysis, drawing on the latest official national data and publicly available #energy, #economic, and #weather#data.


Take-aways:

➢ Global CO2 #emissions from #energy combustion and industrial processes rebounded in 2021 to reach their highest annual level. Emissions increased by almost 2.1 Gt from 2020 levels. This puts 2021 above 2010 as the largest ever year-on-year increase in energy-related #CO2#emissions in absolute terms.


➢ The Covid-19 #pandemic had far-reaching impacts on ##energy demand in 2020, reducing global CO2 emissions by 5.2%. However, the world has experienced a remarkably rapid #economic#recovery since then, driven by unprecedented fiscal and monetary stimulus and a fast – although uneven – the roll-out of #vaccines.


➢ The #recovery of #energy demand in 2021 was compounded by adverse #weather and #energy market conditions, which led to more #coal being burnt despite renewable power generation registering its largest-ever annual growth.


➢ The 6% increase in #CO2emissions in 2021 was in line with the jump in global economic output of 5.9%. This marks the most robust coupling of #CO2emissions with Gross domestic product (#GDP) growth since 2010, when global #emissions rebounded by 6.1% while economic output grew by 5.1% as the world emerged from the #globalfinancialcrisis.


➢ Clean #energy provisions in the recovery packages of several major economies have contributed somewhat to mitigating the near-term rebound in #emissions, primarily where #lowcarbon programs were already in place and could channel the additional support quickly. However, many #recovery plans have added new programs, which have more significant mitigation impacts in the coming years.


Original source: Markus Wimmer


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